Memory deficits associated with recreational use of “ecstasy” (MDMA)

@article{Morgan1999MemoryDA,
  title={Memory deficits associated with recreational use of “ecstasy” (MDMA)},
  author={Michael John Morgan},
  journal={Psychopharmacology},
  year={1999},
  volume={141},
  pages={30-36}
}
  • M. Morgan
  • Published 1999
  • Psychology
  • Psychopharmacology
Abstract Evidence from both animal, and human, studies suggests that repeated administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; “ecstasy”) produces lasting decreases in serotonergic activity. Serotonin is believed to play a modulatory role in a variety of psychological processes, including learning and memory. There are recent reports that polydrug users, who have used ecstasy recreationally, exhibit selective impairments in memory. However, these studies did not compare ecstasy users… 
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Recreational use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or ‘ecstasy’: evidence for cognitive impairment
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