Memory consequences of looking back to notice change: Retroactive and proactive facilitation.

@article{Jacoby2015MemoryCO,
  title={Memory consequences of looking back to notice change: Retroactive and proactive facilitation.},
  author={Larry L. Jacoby and Christopher N. Wahlheim and Colleen M. Kelley},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={2015},
  volume={41 5},
  pages={
          1282-97
        }
}
Three experiments contrasted recollection of change with differentiation as means of avoiding retroactive interference and proactive interference. We manipulated the extent to which participants looked back to notice change between pairs of cues and targets (A-B, A-D) and measured the effects on later cued recall of either the first or second response. Two lists of word pairs were presented. Some right-hand members of pairs were changed within List 2, whereas others were changed between lists… 

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