Memory bias for emotional facial expressions in major depression

@article{Ridout2003MemoryBF,
  title={Memory bias for emotional facial expressions in major depression},
  author={Nathan Ridout and Arlene J. Astell and I. Reid and Tom Glen and Ronan E O’Carroll},
  journal={Cognition and Emotion},
  year={2003},
  volume={17},
  pages={101 - 122}
}
Sixteen clinically depressed patients and sixteen healthy controls were presented with a set of emotional facial expressions and were asked to identify the emotion portrayed by each face. They, were subsequently given a recognition memory test for these faces. There was no difference between the groups in terms of their ability to identify emotion between from faces. All participants identified emotional expressions more accurately than neutral expressions, with happy expressions being… Expand
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