Memory and Executive Function in Aging and AD Multiple Factors that Cause Decline and Reserve Factors that Compensate

@article{Buckner2004MemoryAE,
  title={Memory and Executive Function in Aging and AD Multiple Factors that Cause Decline and Reserve Factors that Compensate},
  author={Randy L. Buckner},
  journal={Neuron},
  year={2004},
  volume={44},
  pages={195-208}
}
  • R. Buckner
  • Published 30 September 2004
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Neuron
Memory decline in aging results from multiple factors that influence both executive function and the medial temporal lobe memory system. In advanced aging, frontal-striatal systems are preferentially vulnerable to white matter change, atrophy, and certain forms of neurotransmitter depletion. Frontal-striatal change may underlie mild memory difficulties in aging that are most apparent on tasks demanding high levels of attention and controlled processing. Through separate mechanisms, Alzheimer's… Expand

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