Membrane-protein topology

@article{Heijne2006MembraneproteinT,
  title={Membrane-protein topology},
  author={Gunnar von Heijne},
  journal={Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology},
  year={2006},
  volume={7},
  pages={909-918}
}
  • G. Heijne
  • Published 1 December 2006
  • Biology
  • Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology
In the world of membrane proteins, topology defines an important halfway house between the amino-acid sequence and the fully folded three-dimensional structure. Although the concept of membrane-protein topology dates back at least 30 years, recent advances in the field of translocon-mediated membrane-protein assembly, proteome-wide studies of membrane-protein topology and an exponentially growing number of high-resolution membrane-protein structures have given us a deeper understanding of how… 

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