Members of a family of drosophila putative odorant-binding proteins are expressed in different subsets of olfactory hairs

@article{Pikielny1994MembersOA,
  title={Members of a family of drosophila putative odorant-binding proteins are expressed in different subsets of olfactory hairs},
  author={C. W. Pikielny and Gaiti Hasan and François Rouyer and Michael Rosbash},
  journal={Neuron},
  year={1994},
  volume={12},
  pages={35-49}
}
A polymerase chain reaction-based method was used to generate a Drosophila melanogaster antennal cDNA library from which head cDNAs were subtracted. We identified five cDNAs that code for antennal proteins containing six cysteines in a conserved pattern shared with known moth antennal proteins, including pheromone-binding proteins. Another cDNA codes for a protein related to vertebrate brain proteins that bind hydrophobic ligands. In all, we describe seven antennal proteins which contain… Expand
The invertebrate odorant-binding protein LUSH is required for normal olfactory behavior in Drosophila.
TLDR
The invertebrate odorant-binding proteins consist of a large family of low-molecular-weight, highly divergent proteins expressed exclusively in the chemosensory sensilla of insects, and mutants defective for LUSH, a Drosophila member of this family, have odor-specific defects in olfactory behavior. Expand
The odorant-binding proteins of Drosophila melanogaster: annotation and characterization of a divergent gene family.
TLDR
Through exhaustive BLAST searches, the total number of OBPs identified in Drosophila melanogaster is increased to 38, and the DNA complementary to RNA corresponding to 21 of these by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction is amplified. Expand
Functional expression and characterization of a Drosophila odorant receptor in a heterologous cell system
TLDR
This report shows the function and specificity of a member of the recently identified family of Drosophila ORs expressed in a heterologous system using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Expand
A Spatial Map of Olfactory Receptor Expression in the Drosophila Antenna
TLDR
A novel family of seven transmembrane domain proteins, encoded by 100 to 200 genes, that is likely to represent the family of Drosophila odorant receptors are identified and may ultimately afford a system to understand the mechanistic link between odor recognition and behavior. Expand
Novel odorant-binding proteins expressed in the taste tissue of the fly.
TLDR
A taste tissue cDNA library of the fleshfly Boettcherisca peregrina was screened with a subtracted cDNA probe enriched with taste-receptor-tissue-specific cDNA and seven genes were identified with sequence similarity to insect odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes, named pheromone binding protein-related proteins (PBPRPs). Expand
Functional characterization of a new class of odorant-binding proteins in the moth Mamestra brassicae.
TLDR
A new protocol of binding assay allowed us to functionally characterize two additional odorant-binding proteins in antennae of the moth Mamestra brassicae, indicating that these proteins constitute a new group of odorants binding proteins in chemosensory organs or tissues. Expand
Expression patterns of two putative odorant-binding proteins in the olfactory organs of Drosophila melanogaster have different implications for their functions
TLDR
Novel features of the localization of two putative OBPs of Drosophila melanogaster are reported,PBPRP2 and PBPRP5, that have important and different implications for their role in olfaction are reported. Expand
Identification of candidate Drosophila olfactory receptors from genomic DNA sequence.
TLDR
The Drosophila olfactory system is simpler than mammalian systems, yet it is complex enough to present a fascinating system in which to study neural information processing, and the powerful genetic manipulations available in Dosophila, when combined with electrophysiological and behavioral analyses, make this an attractive model system inWhich to study Olfactory discrimination. Expand
Genome-wide analysis of the odorant-binding protein gene family in Drosophila melanogaster.
TLDR
The Drosophila genome carries 51 potential OBP genes, a number comparable to that of its odorant-receptor genes, and an intriguing subfamily of 12 putative OBPs that share a unique C-terminal structure with three conserved cysteines and a conserved proline are reported. Expand
Identification of a distinct family of genes encoding atypical odorant‐binding proteins in the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae
TLDR
Phylogenetic analysis of the Anopheles and Drosophila OBP families reveals these proteins fall into several clusters based on sequence similarity and suggests the atypical AgOBP genes arose in the mosquito lineage after the divergence of mosquitoes and flies. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 102 REFERENCES
Odorant-binding-protein subfamilies associate with distinct classes of olfactory receptor neurons in insects.
TLDR
The association of different insect OBP subfamilies with distinct classes of olfactory neurons having different odorant specificities suggests that OBPs can act as selective signal filters, peripheral to the actual receptor proteins. Expand
Isolation of an olfactory cDNA: similarity to retinol-binding protein suggests a role in olfaction.
TLDR
The predicted sequence of this protein is homologous to members of a family of proteins that bind and transport small molecules in serum, suggesting that this protein may also binds and transport odorants in the mucus secreted by Bowman's glands. Expand
Molecular cloning of odorant-binding protein: member of a ligand carrier family.
TLDR
Three complementary DNAs encoding rat odorant-binding protein have now been cloned and sequenced, and RNA blot analysis confirms the localization of OBP messenger RNA in the nasal epithelium. Expand
Novel genes for potential ligand‐binding proteins in subregions of the olfactory mucosa.
TLDR
The olfactory mucosa may possess diverse, functionally‐distinct odorant‐binding proteins which recognize and bind separate classes of odorants. Expand
The family of genes encoding odorant receptors in the channel catfish
TLDR
Analysis of nucleotide sequences suggests that these receptor genes have undergone positive Darwinian selection to generate enhanced diversity within the putative odorant-binding domains, and suggests that the brain may discriminate among odors by determining which neurons have been activated. Expand
Molecular cloning of putative odorant-binding and odorant-metabolizing proteins.
TLDR
Two cDNA clones from mRNA specific to olfactory mucosa encodes a secretory protein with significant homology to odorant-binding protein (OBP) and is expressed in the lateral nasal gland, which is the site of expression of OBP, a new member of the lipophilic molecule carrier protein family. Expand
Expression of members of the putative olfactory receptor gene family in mammalian germ cells
TLDR
The finding suggests that a common receptor gene family encodes olfactory receptors and sperm cell receptors that could be involved in chemotaxis during fertilization. Expand
A novel multigene family may encode odorant receptors: A molecular basis for odor recognition
TLDR
This work has cloned and characterized 18 different members of an extremely large multigene family that encodes seven transmembrane domain proteins whose expression is restricted to the olfactory epithelium and is likely to encode a diverse family of odorant receptors. Expand
Cloning and expression of odorant receptors
TLDR
The identification of new members of the gene family encoding putative odorant receptors are reported and it is demonstrated that they are indeed transcribed in olfactory receptor neurons and expressed in non-neuronal surrogate cells, indicating that the receptors recognize odorants and couple to G proteins of the host cells. Expand
Characterization and cDNA cloning of the pheromone-binding protein from the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta: a tissue-specific developmentally regulated protein.
TLDR
A study of the developmental time course of PBP reveals that it is first synthesized just prior to eclosion and that the percentage of antennal mRNA encoding PBP shifts from zero to about 20% at that time. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...