Melanoma and use of sunscreens: An EORTC case‐control study in germany, belgium and france

@article{Autier1995MelanomaAU,
  title={Melanoma and use of sunscreens: An EORTC case‐control study in germany, belgium and france},
  author={Philippe Autier and Jean François Dor{\'e} and Eug{\'e}ne Schifflers and J. P. C{\'e}sarini and Anne Bollaerts and Klaus F. Koelmel and Olaf Gefeller and Andr{\'e} Liabeuf and Ferdy J. Lejeune and Danièle Liénard and Marie Joarlette and Philippe Chemaly and Ulrich R. Kleeberg},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={1995},
  volume={61}
}
Use of sunscreens is widely advocated as a preventive measure against sun‐induced skin cancers. However, to date, no epidemiologic study has reported a decreased melanoma risk associated with sunscreen use. We have conducted a case‐control study aimed at evaluating the influence of sunscreen use on the occurrence of cutaneous malignant melanoma. In 1991 and 1992, 418 melanoma cases and 438 healthy controls were interviewed in Germany, France and Belgium. The questionnaire used differentiated… 
Melanoma Risk in Relation to Use of Sunscreen or Other Sun Protection Methods
TLDR
Optimal use of routine sunscreen or other sun Protection methods were most strongly associated with decreased melanoma risk; results are limited by the small number of subjects who used sunscreen routinely and lack of specificity regarding other sun protection methods.
Sunscreen Use and the Risk for Melanoma: A Quantitative Review
TLDR
This meta-analysis of 18 casecontrol studies found no good evidence for an increased risk for melanoma with sunscreen use, and the strength and the consistency of the observed associations between melanoma and sunscreen use were examined.
Sunscreen use, wearing clothes, and number of nevi in 6- to 7-year-old European children. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Melanoma Cooperative Group.
TLDR
In white, European children, sunscreen use appears to be associated with development of nevi, probably because it allows longer sun exposures, and wearing clothes may be an effective way to prevent proliferation of nevus.
Use of sunscreen and risk of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
The current evidence suggests no increased risk of skin cancer related to sunscreen use, but this systematic review and meta-analysis does not confirm the expected protective benefits of sunscreen against skin cancer in the general population.
An international evaluation of the cancer–preventive potential of sunscreens
The IARC convened a working group of experts in Lyon, France, on 10–18 April, 2000, to evaluate the cancer‐preventive activity of sunscreens and to compile the fifth volume of the IARC Handbooks of
Effect of sunscreen and clothing on the number of melanocytic nevi in 1,812 German children attending day care.
TLDR
Examination of the potential protective effect of clothing revealed an inverse dose-response correlation between the number of clothes worn at the beach or outdoor swimming pool and thenumber of melanocytic nevi, and public education should aim to protect children primarily by sun avoidance and protective clothing.
Sunscreen use and duration of sun exposure: a double-blind, randomized trial.
TLDR
Use of higher SPF sunscreen seems to increase the duration of recreational sun exposure of young white Europeans.
Sunscreen Use and Duration of Sun Exposure: a Double-Blind, Randomized Trial
TLDR
Use of higher SPF sunscreen seems to increase the duration of recreational sun exposure of young white Europeans.
More about: sunscreen use, wearing clothes, and number of nevi in 6- to 7-year-old European children.
TLDR
The results for those who use sunscreens only for the first few hours suggest that such use provides inadequate protection against the increased risks due to sun exposure or host characteristics, while the results for the “almost always” users argue against any direct increased risk of sunscreen use.
RESPONSE: more about: sunscreen use, wearing clothes, and number of nevi in 6- to 7-year-Old european children
TLDR
In white, European children, sunscreen use appears to be associated with development of nevi, probably because it allows longer sun exposures, and wearing clothes may be an effective way to prevent proliferation of nevus.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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