Melanin- versus carotenoid-based sexual signals: is the difference really so black and red?

@article{Griffith2006MelaninVC,
  title={Melanin- versus carotenoid-based sexual signals: is the difference really so black and red?},
  author={Simon C. Griffith and Timothy H Parker and Val{\'e}rie A. Olson},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2006},
  volume={71},
  pages={749-763}
}
A large number of coloured sexually selected ornamental traits in the animal kingdom are based on carotenoid and melanin pigments. The biochemical differences between these two classes of pigment, together with their different physiological roles, have led to the general belief that there will be a fundamental difference in the way in which they are used in animal signals. Specifically, it has been argued that carotenoid-based colours will have higher levels of condition dependence and that… Expand

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