Megatherium, the stabber

@article{Faria1996MegatheriumTS,
  title={Megatherium, the stabber},
  author={Richard A. Fari{\~n}a and Rudemar Ernesto Blanco},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1996},
  volume={263},
  pages={1725 - 1729}
}
  • R. FariñaR. E. Blanco
  • Published 22 December 1996
  • Environmental Science
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
The traditional point of view that fossil ground sloths (Xenarthra) were a relatively uniform, ecologically little diverse group has been recently challenged. Marine habits have been ascribed to Thalassocnus natans of the Pliocene of Peru. Also, a more diverse diet has been proposed by one of us (R. A. F.) for some Lujanian (late Pleistocene-early Holocene of South America) genera of ground sloths. In this paper, an aspect of this latter hypothesis is tested, i. e. that Megatherium americanum… 

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