Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene

@article{Malhi2016MegafaunaAE,
  title={Megafauna and ecosystem function from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene},
  author={Yadvinder S. Malhi and Christopher E. Doughty and Mauro Galetti and Felisa A. Smith and Jens‐Christian Svenning and John Terborgh},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2016},
  volume={113},
  pages={838 - 846}
}
Large herbivores and carnivores (the megafauna) have been in a state of decline and extinction since the Late Pleistocene, both on land and more recently in the oceans. Much has been written on the timing and causes of these declines, but only recently has scientific attention focused on the consequences of these declines for ecosystem function. Here, we review progress in our understanding of how megafauna affect ecosystem physical and trophic structure, species composition, biogeochemistry… 

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