Meeting the needs of special populations: a formative evaluation of a school-based smoking prevention program.

Abstract

The National Cancer Institute has recommended three minimum components for school-based smoking prevention programs: short-term physiological effects, social consequences, and refusal skills. This investigation compares these minimum components with participant evaluations of the usefulness of content areas of a prevention program. Three hundred 9th grade students participated in the study. Results indicate that Health Hazards, Nonsmokers' Rights, Decision-Making Skills, and Peer Influences were most often rated as "Very Helpful" in resisting pressures to smoke. Assessment of initial knowledge of the health hazards and consequences associated with tobacco use indicate that 77% of the students received a "D" or lower. Results suggest that this group of adolescents, who are at risk for becoming adult smokers, may not be adequately served by public information sources and may therefore benefit from the inclusion of an additional minimum component: information about the long term health consequences associated with smoking.

Cite this paper

@article{Thomas1992MeetingTN, title={Meeting the needs of special populations: a formative evaluation of a school-based smoking prevention program.}, author={Sarah Moody Thomas and Adolph Fick and Jo Ann Henderson}, journal={The Journal of the Louisiana State Medical Society : official organ of the Louisiana State Medical Society}, year={1992}, volume={144 4}, pages={157-61} }