Meeting MDG-5: an impossible dream?

@article{Rosenfield2006MeetingMA,
  title={Meeting MDG-5: an impossible dream?},
  author={Allan G. Rosenfield and Deborah Maine and Lynn P Freedman},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2006},
  volume={368},
  pages={1133-1135}
}
Reduction of the maternal mortality ratio by three-quarters by 2015 is the target for one of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set by 189 countries in 2000. That this goal (MDG-5) is the one towards which the least progress has been made despite the launch nearly 20 years ago of the Safe Motherhood Initiative is widely acknowledged. Nonetheless we believe that substantial progress can be achieved. Indeed a 2003 World Bank report on the success of several developing countries in… Expand
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