Medicine as Social Science: Rudolf Virchow on the Typhus Epidemic in Upper Silesia

@article{Taylor1985MedicineAS,
  title={Medicine as Social Science: Rudolf Virchow on the Typhus Epidemic in Upper Silesia},
  author={R J Taylor and A. Rieger},
  journal={International Journal of Health Services},
  year={1985},
  volume={15},
  pages={547 - 559}
}
  • R. Taylor, A. Rieger
  • Published 1 October 1985
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • International Journal of Health Services
Rudolf Virchow's Report on the 1848 typhus epidemic is one of the neglected classics of “social medicine”—a term he did much to popularize. His analysis of the epidemic emphasized the economic, social, and cultural factors involved in its etiology, and clearly identified the contradictory social forces that prevented any simple solution. Instead of recommending medical changes (i.e., more doctors or hospitals), he outlined a revolutionary program of social reconstruction; including full… Expand
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