Corpus ID: 9640884

Medications and Myasthenia Gravis ( A Reference for Health Care Professionals )

@inproceedings{Mehrizi2012MedicationsAM,
  title={Medications and Myasthenia Gravis ( A Reference for Health Care Professionals )},
  author={Mehyar Mehrizi and Rodrigue F. Fontem and Tiffany R. Gearhart and Robert M. Pascuzzi},
  year={2012}
}
Introduction Patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) or Lambert-Eaton syndrome (LES) may have worsening of symptoms upon exposure to a variety of medications. Underlying disorders of neuromuscular transmission may affect presynaptic release of acetylcholine (LES) or the postsynaptic muscle fiber membrane at the endplate (MG). Similarly, adverse drug effects can occur presynaptically or postsynaptically. In a patient with a reduced safety factor for neuromuscular transmission, exposure to a drug or… Expand
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TLDR
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