Medication error prevention by clinical pharmacists in two children's hospitals.

@article{Folli1987MedicationEP,
  title={Medication error prevention by clinical pharmacists in two children's hospitals.},
  author={H L Folli and Robert L. Poole and William E. Benitz and Janita C Russo},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={1987},
  volume={79 5},
  pages={
          718-22
        }
}
The purpose of this study was to record prospectively the frequency of and potential harm caused by errant medication orders at two large pediatric hospitals. The objective of the study was to assess the impact of pharmacist intervention in preventing potential harm. The study was conducted during a 6-month period. A total of 281 and 198 errors were detected at the institutions. The overall error rates for the two hospitals were 1.35 and 1.77 per 100-patient days, and 4.9 and 4.5 per 1,000… 
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