Medication compliance in ischaemic stroke patients.

Abstract

AIM This study aimed to assess the degree of patient compliance with medications prescribed at hospital discharge following ischaemic stroke, and concordance between self-reported medication use and general practitioner (GP) records. METHODS The Auckland City Hospital Stroke database was used to identify consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke over a three-month period. Participants were contacted and invited to participate in a telephone questionnaire that asked about current medications. GPs were also asked to list the medications their patients were taking. RESULTS Fifty-one patients were approached to participate of whom 48 consented to be interviewed at 6 weeks and 47 at 6 months. At 6 weeks, 36 of 38 (95%) were compliant with aspirin, 12 of 13 (92%) dipyridamole, 8 of 9 (88%) warfarin, 36 of 41 (88%) statins, 33 of 38 (87%) antihypertensive medications, and 7 of 7 (100%) diabetes medications. At 6 months, 97% were compliant with aspirin, 100% dipyridamole, 100% warfarin, 94% statins, 91% antihypertensive medications, and 100% diabetes medications. Natural or herbal remedy use was reported by 10 of 48 (21%) at 6 weeks and 11 of 47 (23%) at 6 months. Blister packs were used by 8 of 48 (17%) at 6 weeks and 5 of 47 (11%) at 6 months. CONCLUSION Adherence to secondary stroke prevention medication was between 87% and 100% at 6 weeks with similar findings at 6 months after discharge. We speculate that these high compliance rates may be due to one-on-one stroke nurse counselling and the use of stroke information packs, which include information about the importance of adherence to secondary prevention medication.

DOI: 10.1111/j.1445-5994.2010.02209.x

Cite this paper

@article{Johnson2012MedicationCI, title={Medication compliance in ischaemic stroke patients.}, author={Chelsea V. Johnson and Hazel Lane and P Alan Barber and Alison J Charleston}, journal={Internal medicine journal}, year={2012}, volume={42 4}, pages={e47-52} }