Medical error—the third leading cause of death in the US

@article{Makary2016MedicalET,
  title={Medical error—the third leading cause of death in the US},
  author={Martin A. Makary and Michael Daniel},
  journal={British Medical Journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={353}
}
Medical error is not included on death certificates or in rankings of cause of death. Martin Makary and Michael Daniel assess its contribution to mortality and call for better reporting 
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