Medical chemists and the origins of clinical chemistry in Britain (circa 1750-1850).

@article{Coley2004MedicalCA,
  title={Medical chemists and the origins of clinical chemistry in Britain (circa 1750-1850).},
  author={Noel George Coley},
  journal={Clinical chemistry},
  year={2004},
  volume={50 5},
  pages={
          961-72
        }
}
  • N. Coley
  • Published 1 May 2004
  • Medicine
  • Clinical chemistry
In this history, I review developments leading toward the establishment of clinical chemistry in Britain. Chemical research by certain physicians occurred in the context of medical traditions founded on vitalism, distillation analysis, and limited chemical knowledge. Urine chemistry figured prominently in this period together with the analysis of kidney and bladder stones. Bright's team studying albuminuria was the first clinical research school in Britain, whereas Prout's survey of… 

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