Medical Electricity and Madness in the 18th Century: the legacies of Benjamin Franklin and Jan Ingenhousz

@article{Beaudreau2006MedicalEA,
  title={Medical Electricity and Madness in the 18th Century: the legacies of Benjamin Franklin and Jan Ingenhousz},
  author={Sherry A. Beaudreau and Stanley Finger},
  journal={Perspectives in Biology and Medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={49},
  pages={330 - 345}
}
Benjamin Franklin had at least two accidents that resulted in electricity passing through his brain. In addition, he witnessed a patient's similar accident and performed an experiment that showed how humans could endure shocks to the head without serious ill effects, other than amnesia. Jan Ingenhousz, Franklin's Dutch-born medical correspondent better known for his discovery of photosynthesis, also had a serious accident that sent electricity though his head and, in a letter to Franklin, he… 

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