Medicaid and Mortality: New Evidence from Linked Survey and Administrative Data

@article{Miller2019MedicaidAM,
  title={Medicaid and Mortality: New Evidence from Linked Survey and Administrative Data},
  author={Sarah Miller and S. Altekruse and N. Johnson and Laura R Wherry},
  journal={NBER Working Paper Series},
  year={2019}
}
We use large-scale federal survey data linked to administrative death records to investigate the relationship between Medicaid enrollment and mortality. Our analysis compares changes in mortality for near-elderly adults in states with and without Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansions. We identify adults most likely to benefit using survey information on socioeconomic and citizenship status, and public program participation. We find a 0.132 percentage point decline in annual mortality, a 9.4… Expand

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