Medial prefrontal cortex and self-referential mental activity: Relation to a default mode of brain function

@article{Gusnard2001MedialPC,
  title={Medial prefrontal cortex and self-referential mental activity: Relation to a default mode of brain function},
  author={Debra A. Gusnard and Erbil Akbudak and Gordon L. Shulman and Marcus E. Raichle},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2001},
  volume={98},
  pages={4259 - 4264}
}
  • D. Gusnard, E. Akbudak, +1 author M. Raichle
  • Published 20 March 2001
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is among those brain regions having the highest baseline metabolic activity at rest and one that exhibits decreases from this baseline across a wide variety of goal-directed behaviors in functional imaging studies. This high metabolic rate and this behavior suggest the existence of an organized mode of default brain function, elements of which may be either attenuated or enhanced. Extant data suggest that these MPFC regions may contribute to the neural… Expand
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