Media reporting on research presented at scientific meetings: more caution needed

@article{Woloshin2006MediaRO,
  title={Media reporting on research presented at scientific meetings: more caution needed},
  author={Steven Woloshin and Lisa M. Schwartz},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={2006},
  volume={184}
}
Objective: To examine media stories on research presented at scientific meetings to see if they reported basic study facts and cautions, and whether they were clear about the preliminary stage of the research. 
The media miss key points in scientific reporting.
Media coverage of information presented at medical meetings often fails to qualify the findings reported, and scientists and the media need to develop a better working relationship to ensure the
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