Media, Terrorism, and Emotionality: Emotional Differences in Media Content and Public Reactions to the September 11th Terrorist Attacks

@article{Cho2003MediaTA,
  title={Media, Terrorism, and Emotionality: Emotional Differences in Media Content and Public Reactions to the September 11th Terrorist Attacks},
  author={J. Cho and Michael P. Boyle and Heejo Keum and Mark Shevy and Douglas M. McLeod and Dhavan V. Shah and Z. Pan},
  journal={Journal of Broadcasting \& Electronic Media},
  year={2003},
  volume={47},
  pages={309 - 327}
}
Research on print and broadcast media shows differences in cognitive and affective responses. We extend that research by combining content analysis and survey methods to examine medium differences in the emotional tone of coverage concerning the September 11th terrorist attacks, and audience differences in emotional reactions to the attacks. A computer- aided content analysis of national television and newspaper transcripts demonstrates that television news was consistently more emotional than… Expand
Stereotypical Portrayals of Emotionality in News Photos
Television journalism during terror attacks
The Influence of Television News Depictions of the Images of War on Viewers
Through the Looking Glass: The Role of Ethnicity and Affiliation in Responses to Terrorism in the Media
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 43 REFERENCES
Format and Symbols in TV Coverage of Terrorism in the United States and Great Britain
TV news images that induce anger, fear, and disgust: Effects on approach‐avoidance and memory
Is anyone responsible? How television frames political issues.
American journalism and the decline in event‐centered reporting
CNN, the Gulf War, and Journalistic Practice
Non‐Routine News and Newswork: Exploring a What‐a‐Story
...
1
2
3
4
5
...