Mechanotransduction in bone: do bone cells act as sensors of fluid flow?

@article{Turner1994MechanotransductionIB,
  title={Mechanotransduction in bone: do bone cells act as sensors of fluid flow?},
  author={Charles H. Turner and Mark R. Forwood and Mark W. Otter},
  journal={The FASEB Journal},
  year={1994},
  volume={8},
  pages={875 - 878}
}
When compact bone is subjected to bending loads, interstitial fluid in the bone matrix flows away from regions of high compressive stress. The amount of interstitial fluid flow is strongly influenced by the loading rate in a dose‐dependent fashion, We hypothesize that interstitial fluid flow affects bone formation, and we tested this hypothesis indirectly by measuring the effect of different loading frequencies on bone formation rate in vivo. The right tibiae of adult female rats were subjected… 
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Bone is a dynamic tissue that adjusts its structure over time to adapt to changes in mechanical load. This adaptive ability is critical to skeletal development and maintenance of optimal skeletal
Effects of Loading Frequency on Mechanically Induced Bone Formation
  • Y. Hsieh, C. Turner
  • Materials Science, Medicine
    Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
  • 2001
TLDR
Periosteal osteogenesis was best predicted by a mathematical model that assumed: (1) bone cells are activated by fluid shear stresses and (2) stiffness of the bone cells and the extracellular matrix near the cells increases at higher loading frequencies because of viscoelasticity.
Mechanobiology of bone
TLDR
In the unloaded condition, the functions of the osteocyte network are augmented, whereas exercise could decrease inhibitory effects on bone mass by reducing both osteoclastogenesis and inhibition on osteoblast function.
Would increased interstitial fluid flow through in situ mechanical stimulation enhance bone remodeling?
TLDR
It is hypothesize that the efficiency of bone remodeling can be improved if a small mechanical percussion device could be placed directly in contact with the bone, thus inducing local interstitial fluid flow variations.
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