Mechanotransduction and the functional response of bone to mechanical strain

@article{Duncan2004MechanotransductionAT,
  title={Mechanotransduction and the functional response of bone to mechanical strain},
  author={Randall L. Duncan and Charles H. Turner},
  journal={Calcified Tissue International},
  year={2004},
  volume={57},
  pages={344-358}
}
  • R. Duncan, C. Turner
  • Published 1 November 1995
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Calcified Tissue International
Mechanotransduction plays a crucial role in the physiology of many tissues including bone. Mechanical loading can inhibit bone resorption and increase bone formation in vivo. In bone, the process of mechanotransduction can be divided into four distinct steps: (1) mechanocoupling, (2) biochemical coupling, (3) transmission of signal, and (4) effector cell response. In mechanocoupling, mechanical loads in vivo cause deformations in bone that stretch bone cells within and lining the bone matrix… 
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