Mechanistic View of Risk Factors for Venous Thromboembolism

@article{Reitsma2012MechanisticVO,
  title={Mechanistic View of Risk Factors for Venous Thromboembolism},
  author={Pieter H. Reitsma and Henri H Versteeg and Saskia Middeldorp},
  journal={Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={32},
  pages={563–568}
}
Venous thromboembolism is an episodic disease with an annual incidence of 2 to 3/1000 per year that is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism come in many guises. They fit into an extended version of Virchow's triad and they tilt the hemostatic balance toward clot formation. This can be achieved by decreasing blood flow and lowering oxygen tension, by activating the endothelium, by activating innate or acquired immune responses, by activating… Expand
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