Mechanisms used to restore ventilation after partial upper airway collapse during sleep in humans.

@article{Jordan2007MechanismsUT,
  title={Mechanisms used to restore ventilation after partial upper airway collapse during sleep in humans.},
  author={Amy S Jordan and Andrew Wellman and Raphael Heinzer and Yu-Lun Lo and Karen E Schory and Louise Dover and Shiva Gautam and Atul Malhotra and David P. White},
  journal={Thorax},
  year={2007},
  volume={62 10},
  pages={861-7}
}
BACKGROUND Most patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) can restore airflow after an obstructive respiratory event without arousal at least some of the time. The mechanisms that enable this ventilatory recovery are unclear but probably include increased upper airway dilator muscle activity and/or changes in respiratory timing. The aims of this study were to compare the ability to recover ventilation and the mechanisms of compensation following a sudden reduction of continuous positive… CONTINUE READING

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