Mechanisms of sound-production and muscle contraction kinetics in cicadas

@article{Young2004MechanismsOS,
  title={Mechanisms of sound-production and muscle contraction kinetics in cicadas},
  author={David C. Young and Robert K. Josephson},
  journal={Journal of comparative physiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={152},
  pages={183-195}
}
Summary1.The mechanisms of sound-production are described in 7 species of Australian cicadas:Abricta curvicosta, Arunta perulata, Chlorocysta viridis, Psaltoda argentata, P. claripennis, P. harrisii andTamasa tristigma. In all these species, sound is produced by a pair of tymbals, each of which is buckled by a large muscle (Figs. 1–7). The tymbal muscles are all of the synchronous (= neurogenic) type.2.There are great differences between species in the range of sound frequencies generated by… 

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  • D. Young
  • Biology
    Journal of comparative physiology
  • 2004
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Pure-tone songs in cicadas with special reference to the genusMagicicada

It is suggested that pure-tone songs in cicadas are made possible by a reduction in the stiffness of the tymbal, which permits the precise time of buckling of each rib to be influenced by the phase of oscillation in the abdominal resonator, thereby creating a coherent and continuous train of sound waves.

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