Mechanisms of intracellular protein transport

@article{Rothman1994MechanismsOI,
  title={Mechanisms of intracellular protein transport},
  author={James E. Rothman},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1994},
  volume={372},
  pages={55-63}
}
  • J. Rothman
  • Published 3 November 1994
  • Biology, Chemistry, Medicine
  • Nature
Recent advances have uncovered the general protein apparatus used by all eukaryotes for intracellular transport, including secretion and endocytosis, and for triggered exocytosis of hormones and neurotransmitters. Membranes are shaped into vesicles by cytoplasmic coats which then dissociate upon GTP hydrolysis. Both vesicles and their acceptor membranes carry targeting proteins which interact specifically to initiate docking. A general apparatus then assembles at the docking site and fuses the… Expand
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