Mechanisms of avian egg-recognition: Do birds know their own eggs?

@article{Rothstein1975MechanismsOA,
  title={Mechanisms of avian egg-recognition: Do birds know their own eggs?},
  author={Stephen I. Rothstein},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1975},
  volume={23},
  pages={268-278}
}
Mechanisms of Avian Egg Recognition: Possible Learned and Innate Factors
TLDR
Three new experiments reported here were done on naturally breeding Gray Catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis) and showed that catbirds are extremely intolerant of foreign eggs placed in their nests.
Mechanisms of avian egg recognition: Which egg parameters elicit responses by rejecter species?
TLDR
Birds have apparently responded evolutionarily to brood parasitism by developing recognition of their own eggs, rather than by developed recognition and rejection specific to parasitic eggs.
Successes and Failures in Avian Egg and Nestling Recognition With Comments on the Utility of Optimality Reasoning
TLDR
It is argued here that while optimality reasoning is the best and most all-inclusive paradigm in biology, its value will be enhanced if its limitations are recognized.
Moorhens have an internal representation of their own eggs
TLDR
It is shown experimentally that moorhens will cease laying in a nest when their first egg is replaced with another hen’s egg but not when it is replacing with their own egg taken from an earlier clutch, providing good evidence that birds have an internal representation of their own eggs and use this in decisions about whether to reject foreign eggs.
Reject the odd egg: egg recognition mechanisms in parrotbills
TLDR
Egg experiments in the ashy-throated parrotbill, a common cuckoo host that lays immaculate, polymorphic eggs, obtained support for true recognition and discordancy in egg recognition in a single population.
Mechanisms of avian egg-recognition: Additional evidence for learned components
Discordancy or template-based recognition? Dissecting the cognitive basis of the rejection of foreign eggs in hosts of avian brood parasites
TLDR
Hosts rejected their own eggs and manipulated (‘parasitic’) eggs above control levels in experiments when manipulated eggs were in the majority but when clutches also included a minority of own eggs, supporting a mechanism of template-based egg discrimination.
Egg discrimination by hosts and obligate brood parasites: a historical perspective and new synthesis
With the knowledge that cuckoos and cowbirds lay their eggs parasitically, and that some hosts eject parasitic eggs, ornithologists began to ponder the question of how host females discriminate
Do first-time breeding females imprint on their own eggs?
TLDR
It is found that contrary to what the hypothesis predicts first-time breeding females did not reject their own eggs in their second breeding attempt, and it is likely that egg discrimination is not influenced by egg appearance in the first breeding attempt.
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 10 REFERENCES
Mechanisms of Avian Egg Recognition: Possible Learned and Innate Factors
TLDR
Three new experiments reported here were done on naturally breeding Gray Catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis) and showed that catbirds are extremely intolerant of foreign eggs placed in their nests.
Observation and Experiment in the Analysis of Interactions between Brood Parasites and Their Hosts
TLDR
There is need for additional work on Payne's most significant points-his attempt to provide evidence for the adaptiveness of the polymorphism in egg color found in the parasitic African diederik cuckoo (Chrysococcyx caprius), as there is some doubt as to whether Payne's data prove this point.
Egg Weights from Egg Measurements
TLDR
If it were possible to ascertain the original weights of all these eggs from the empty shells one conceivably could gather a mass of data amply sufficient to settle the question as to whether or not a relation exists between an egg's weight and the time it takes to incubate it.
EVOLUTION OF BROOD PARASITISM IN ALTRICIAL BIRDS
TLDR
Brood parasitism has evolved independently in African weaver birds (Ploceidae) and in several species of blackbirds (Icteridae), and the independent evolution of brood parasitism in these diverse phyletic lines is clear.
Prolonged Incubation Behaviour of Red-Winged Blackbird Incubating Several Egg Sizes
TLDR
Non-passerines tend to remain on unhatched eggs for a relatively longer period of time compared to normal incubation period length than do passerines, with such notable exceptions as Columbids.
The Advantage of being Parasitized
Host–brood parasite interactions may not always be as they seem.
Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences.
This is the revision of the classic text in the field, adding two new chapters and thoroughly updating all others. The original structure is retained, and the book continues to serve as a combined