Mechanisms of Prostate Tumorigenesis: Roles for Transcription Factors Nkx3.1 and Egr1

@article{Abdulkadir2005MechanismsOP,
  title={Mechanisms of Prostate Tumorigenesis: Roles for Transcription Factors Nkx3.1 and Egr1},
  author={Sarki A Abdulkadir},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={1059}
}
  • S. Abdulkadir
  • Published 1 November 2005
  • Biology
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Abstract: Recent developments in the generation and analysis of transgenic mouse models have improved our understanding of the early stages of prostate tumorigenesis. Analysis of models based on the homeodomain protein Nkx3.1 and the zinc finger protein Egr1 suggests that these transcription factors play distinct roles in the initiation and progression of precursor prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions, respectively. Nkx3.1 is a candidate prostate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that… 

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Loss of NKX 3 . 1 Favors Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C Expression in Prostate Cancer

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