Mechanism for the production of echolocating clicks by the grey swiftlet,Collocalia spodiopygia

@article{Suthers2004MechanismFT,
  title={Mechanism for the production of echolocating clicks by the grey swiftlet,Collocalia spodiopygia},
  author={R. Suthers and D. Hector},
  journal={Journal of comparative physiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={148},
  pages={457-470}
}
Summary1.Orientation sounds of the echolocating swiftlet,Collocalia spodiopygia (family Apodidae) consist of two clicks, each having a duration of a few milliseconds, separated from each other by a silent interval lasting about 20 ms (Fig. 1). Most of the acoustic energy is between 2 and 8 kHz.2.These clicks are generated in the syrinx and require syringeal airflow.3.The first member of the double click is initiated by contraction of the sternotrachealis muscles (Fig. 3) which reduces tension… Expand

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