Mechanics, hydrodynamics and energetics of blue whale lunge feeding: efficiency dependence on krill density

@article{Goldbogen2011MechanicsHA,
  title={Mechanics, hydrodynamics and energetics of blue whale lunge feeding: efficiency dependence on krill density},
  author={Jeremy A. Goldbogen and John Calambokidis and Erin M. Oleson and Jean Potvin and Nicholas D. Pyenson and Gregory S. Schorr and Robert E. Shadwick},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={214},
  pages={131 - 146}
}
SUMMARY Lunge feeding by rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) is associated with a high energetic cost that decreases diving capacity, thereby limiting access to dense prey patches at depth. Despite this cost, rorquals exhibit high rates of lipid deposition and extremely large maximum body size. To address this paradox, we integrated kinematic data from digital tags with unsteady hydrodynamic models to estimate the energy budget for lunges and foraging dives of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus… Expand
Rorqual Lunge-Feeding Energetics Near and Away from the Kinematic Threshold of Optimal Efficiency
TLDR
Humpback and blue whales are large baleen-bearing cetaceans, which use a unique prey-acquisition strategy to engulf entire patches of large plankton or schools of forage fish and the water in which they are embedded, to show that when krill-feeding at depth while using a wide range of prey approach swimming speeds, rorquals generate significant and widely varying metabolic power output during engulfment. Expand
Kinematic Diversity in Rorqual Whale Feeding Mechanisms
TLDR
Data suggest that rorquals modulate the coordination of acceleration and engulfment to optimize foraging efficiency by minimizing locomotor costs and maximizing prey capture and indicates that the energetic efficiency of foraging is driven both by the whale's engulfment capacity and the comparative locomotor capabilities of predator and prey. Expand
Keeping momentum with a mouthful of water: behavior and kinematics of humpback whale lunge feeding
TLDR
Analysis of 479 lunges from five humpback whales reveals that the whales accelerate as they acquire prey, opening their gape in synchrony with strong fluke strokes, explaining the shorter dive times than expected given their sizes. Expand
Lunge filter feeding biomechanics constrain rorqual foraging ecology across scale
TLDR
Morphology predicts behavior and physiological performance, which for rorquals results in both biomechanical and ecological constraints, which highlights a scale-dependent trade-off between engulfment capacity and baleen area that creates a biomechanicals constraint to foraging through increased filtration time. Expand
Metabolic Expenditures of Lunge Feeding Rorquals Across Scale: Implications for the Evolution of Filter Feeding and the Limits to Maximum Body Size
TLDR
The results not only point to a physiological limit on maximum body size in this lineage, but also have major implications for the ontogeny of extant rorquals as well as the evolutionary pathways used by ancestral toothed whales to transition from hunting individual prey items to filter feeding on prey aggregations. Expand
How Baleen Whales Feed: The Biomechanics of Engulfment and Filtration.
TLDR
The current state of the field is reviewed by exploring several hypotheses that aim to explain how baleen whales feed, including multi-sensor tags, active acoustic prey mapping, and hydrodynamic modeling. Expand
Underwater acrobatics by the world's largest predator: 360° rolling manoeuvres by lunge-feeding blue whales
TLDR
The results reveal the complex manoeuvrability that is required for large rorqual whales to exploit prey patches and highlight the need to fully understand the three-dimensional interactions between predator and prey in the natural environment. Expand
Scaling of lunge‐feeding performance in rorqual whales: mass‐specific energy expenditure increases with body size and progressively limits diving capacity
TLDR
The data suggest that, unlike all other true divers, adult rorqual species do not exhibit a positive relationship between body size and diving capacity, a trade-off that favours the efficient exploitation of patchily dense prey aggregations. Expand
Insight into the kinematics of blue whale surface foraging through drone observations and prey data
TLDR
It is concluded that surface foraging could be an important strategy for blue whales, and integration of UAS with tag-based studies may expand the understanding of their foraging ecology by examining surface feeding events in conjunction with behaviors at depth. Expand
The advantages of diving deep: Fin whales quadruple their energy intake when targeting deep krill patches
TLDR
It is posit that feeding on the deep prey patches significantly increases the energetic efficiency of foraging, and endangered fin whales may be susceptible to significant energetic losses that may impact individual fitness and population health in some areas. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 97 REFERENCES
Foraging behavior of humpback whales: kinematic and respiratory patterns suggest a high cost for a lunge
TLDR
High-resolution digital tags on foraging humpback whales used to determine the number of lunges executed per dive as well as respiratory frequency between dives suggest that the high energetic cost associated with lunge feeding in blue and fin whales also occurs in intermediate sized rorquals. Expand
Big gulps require high drag for fin whale lunge feeding
TLDR
This analysis suggests that the reconfiguration and expansion of the buccal cavity enables an adult fin whale to engulf approxi- mately 60 to 82 m 3 of water, a volume greater than its entire body, which comes at a high cost because the drag, work against drag, and drag coefficient dramatically increase over the course of a lunge. Expand
Scaling of lunge feeding in rorqual whales: an integrated model of engulfment duration.
TLDR
This study provides the theoretical framework required to estimate the scaling of the mass-specific drag being generated during engulfment, as well as the energy expenditures incurred. Expand
Passive versus active engulfment: verdict from trajectory simulations of lunge-feeding fin whales Balaenoptera physalus
TLDR
It is suggested that adult rorquals actively push engulfed water forward from the very onset of mouth opening in order to successfully complete a lunge, and reflux creation adds a significant source of hydrodynamic drag to the lunge process. Expand
Kinematics of foraging dives and lunge-feeding in fin whales
TLDR
Examination of body kinematics at depth reveals variable lunge-feeding behavior in the context of distinct kinematic modes, which exhibit temporal coordination of rotational torques with translational accelerations. Expand
High feeding costs limit dive time in the largest whales.
TLDR
The hypothesis that the foraging behavior of these two species (lunge-feeding) is energetically expensive and limits their dive duration is tested to show that prey did not disperse and thus that prey dispersal could not account for the limited dive durations of the whales. Expand
Skull and buccal cavity allometry increase mass-specific engulfment capacity in fin whales
TLDR
Allometric equations for fin whale body dimensions and engulfment capacity demonstrate that larger fin whales have larger skulls and larger buccal cavities relative to body size, and suggest that engulfment volume is also allometric, increasing with body length. Expand
The cost of foraging by a marine predator, the Weddell seal Leptonychotes weddellii: pricing by the stroke
TLDR
The results show that the energy expended in digestion for a free-ranging marine mammal are additive to locomotor and basal costs, and the aerobic cost of diving infree-ranging seals where cryptic behavior and remote locations prevent direct energetic measurements. Expand
Cetacean Energetics, an Overview of Intraspecific Size Variation
TLDR
The adult body size within species is inversely correlated with the length of the feeding season and directly correlated with prey availability during that period, as differences in diversity of prey and/or their year-round availability become less marked between hemispheres. Expand
Shallow and deep lunge feeding of humpback whales in fjords of the West Antarctic Peninsula
TLDR
It is found that lunges contain extreme accelerations reaching 2.5 m/s2 in certain instances, which are then followed by decelerations, suggesting a biomechanical constraint on lunges when animals are intensively feeding. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...