Meat ants as dominant members of Australian ant communities: an experimental test of their influence on the foraging success and forager abundance of other species

@article{Andersen2004MeatAA,
  title={Meat ants as dominant members of Australian ant communities: an experimental test of their influence on the foraging success and forager abundance of other species},
  author={Alan N. Andersen and A. D. Patel},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={98},
  pages={15-24}
}
Meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus and allies) are perceived to be dominant members of Australian ant communities because of their great abundance, high rates of activity, and extreme aggressiveness. Here we describe the first experimental test of their influence on other ant species, and one of the first experimental studies of the influence of a dominant species on any diverse ant community. The study was conducted at a 0.4 ha savanna woodland site in the seasonal tropics of northern Australia… Expand
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