Corpus ID: 150137719

Measuring the bias to look to the eyes in individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder

@inproceedings{Thompson2017MeasuringTB,
  title={Measuring the bias to look to the eyes in individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder},
  author={Sarah Thompson},
  year={2017}
}
  • Sarah Thompson
  • Published 2017
  • Psychology
  • The overarching goal of this thesis was to investigate looking patterns in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which is characterised by difficulties in modulating social eye gaze. Despite a large body of literature investigating where autistic individuals look when viewing a face, there is limited research into first fixation locations and into their capacity for altering looking patterns in line with an instruction. A novel prompting paradigm was used to investigate where individuals looked when… CONTINUE READING

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