Measuring Trends in Leisure: The Allocation of Time Over Five Decades

@article{Hurst2006MeasuringTI,
  title={Measuring Trends in Leisure: The Allocation of Time Over Five Decades},
  author={Erik Hurst and Mark Aguiar},
  journal={Labor: Personnel Economics},
  year={2006}
}
In this paper, we use five decades of time-use surveys to document trends in the allocation of time within the United States. We find that a dramatic increase in leisure time lies behind the relatively stable number of market hours worked between 1965 and 2003. Specifically, using a variety of definitions for leisure, we show that leisure for men increased by roughly six to nine hours per week (driven by a decline in market work hours) and for women by roughly four to eight hours per week… 
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