Measuring Emotional Intelligence of Medical School Applicants

@article{Carrothers2000MeasuringEI,
  title={Measuring Emotional Intelligence of Medical School Applicants},
  author={Robert M. Carrothers and Stanford W. Jr. Gregory and Timothy J. Gallagher},
  journal={Academic Medicine},
  year={2000},
  volume={75},
  pages={456–463}
}
Purpose To discuss the development, pilot testing, and analysis of a 34-item semantic differential instrument for measuring medical school applicants' emotional intelligence (the EI instrument). Method The authors analyzed data from the admission interviews of 147 1997 applicants to a six-year BS/MD program that is composed of three consortium universities. They compared the applicants' scores on traditional admission criteria (e.g., GPA and traditional interview assessments) with their scores… 

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