Measuring Belief in Conspiracy Theories: The Generic Conspiracist Beliefs Scale

@article{Brotherton2013MeasuringBI,
  title={Measuring Belief in Conspiracy Theories: The Generic Conspiracist Beliefs Scale},
  author={Robert Brotherton and Christopher C. French and Alan Pickering},
  journal={Frontiers in Psychology},
  year={2013},
  volume={4}
}
The psychology of conspiracy theory beliefs is not yet well understood, although research indicates that there are stable individual differences in conspiracist ideation – individuals’ general tendency to engage with conspiracy theories. Researchers have created several short self-report measures of conspiracist ideation. These measures largely consist of items referring to an assortment of prominent conspiracy theories regarding specific real-world events. However, these instruments have not… 

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