Measurement of the Production of Organic Matter in the Sea by means of Carbon-14

@article{Nielsen1951MeasurementOT,
  title={Measurement of the Production of Organic Matter in the Sea by means of Carbon-14},
  author={E. Steemann Nielsen},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1951},
  volume={167},
  pages={684-685}
}
  • E. Nielsen
  • Published 28 April 1951
  • Environmental Science, Medicine
  • Nature
IT has often been suggested that by far the greatest production of organic matter on earth is due to the marine plankton algæ. Investigations are, however, extremely scarce. In some few areas the quantities of organic matter produced have been calculated by means of indirect methods, as, for example, from the decrease of nutrient salts or carbon dioxide during a definite period. The quantities calculated are, at best, minimum values for production, as account could be taken neither of the… Expand
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