Maximizing returns for public funding of medical research with open-source hardware

@article{Pearce2017MaximizingRF,
  title={Maximizing returns for public funding of medical research with open-source hardware},
  author={Joshua M. Pearce},
  journal={Health policy and technology},
  year={2017},
  volume={6},
  pages={381-382}
}

Economic savings for scientific free and open source technology: A review

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