Matters of Spirituality at the End of Life in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

@article{Robinson2006MattersOS,
  title={Matters of Spirituality at the End of Life in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit},
  author={M. Ren{\'e}e Robinson and Mary Martha Thiel and Meghan M Backus and Elaine C. Meyer},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2006},
  volume={118},
  pages={e719 - e729}
}
OBJECTIVE. Our objective with this study was to identify the nature and the role of spirituality from the parents' perspective at the end of life in the PICU and to discern clinical implications. METHODS. A qualitative study based on parental responses to open-ended questions on anonymous, self-administered questionnaires was conducted at 3 PICUs in Boston, Massachusetts. Fifty-six parents whose children had died in PICUs after the withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies participated. RESULTS… 

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