Mating system and mating success of the desert spider Agelenopsis aperta

@article{Singer2004MatingSA,
  title={Mating system and mating success of the desert spider Agelenopsis aperta},
  author={Fred Singer and S. Riechert},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={36},
  pages={313-322}
}
Field studies of the desert spider Agelenopsis aperta revealed a primarily monogamous mating system. However polygyny, polyandry and polygynandry were superimposed upon the primary system, with 9% of the marked males and 11% of the marked females in a field population mating more than once. In the laboratory males commonly mated multiply with fertile offspring resulting, while females were less likely than males to mate multiply. Monogamy under field conditions was enforced by two factors: (1… Expand

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