Mating behaviors of the proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus)

@article{Murai2006MatingBO,
  title={Mating behaviors of the proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus)},
  author={Tadahiro Murai},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={2006},
  volume={68}
}
  • T. Murai
  • Published 2006
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American Journal of Primatology
The mating behaviors of the proboscis monkey were observed in a riverine forest along a tributary of the Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Malaysia, for a period of 30 months. Solicitation for copulation was initiated frequently by males and occasionally by females. Most copulations involved only one mount; however, some multiple‐mount copulations were observed and a maximum of six mounts per copulation were recorded. The mean duration of mounts was about 27 sec. Nonsexual mounts (female–female… Expand
ON THE SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR AND BIRTH SEASONALITY OF PROBOSCIS MONKEY ( Nasalis larvatus ) ALONG THE LOWER KINABATANGAN RIVER , NORTHERN BORNEO
Sexual behaviour of Proboscis Monkey Nasalis larvatus was observed along the Lower Kinabatangan River in eastern Sabah, Bornean Malaysia, during a two-year field study. Eight sexual mounts and twoExpand
The ecology and behaviour of proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) in mangrove habitat of Labuk Bay, Sabah
TLDR
The results indicated that the activity patterns for semi-Wild proboscis monkeys are similar with those In the wild, and the significant positive correlations between monthly feeding frequencies to monthly pancakes and young leaves feeding frequencies suggest that pancakes and mangroves plants are equally important food sources for proboscIS monkeys in LBPMS. Expand
Clouded leopard (Neofelis diardi) predation on proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) in Sabah, Malaysia
TLDR
It is suggested that clouded leopard and crocodile might be significant potential predators of proboscis monkeys of any age or sex and that predation threats elicit the monkeys’ anti-predator strategies. Expand
Use and Selection of Sleeping Sites by Proboscis Monkeys, Nasalislarvatus, along the Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Malaysia
TLDR
This study investigates several tree characteristics influencing the sleeping site selection by proboscis monkeys along Kinabatangan River, in Sabah, Malaysia and suggests that the selection of particular sleeping tree features (i.e. tall, high first branch) by proboscopeis monkeys is mostly influenced by antipredation strategies. Expand
Nasalis larvatus (Primates: Colobini)
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The ethogram and behavioural data provided have improved ourstanding on the behavioural patterns of the N. larvatus in Bako National Park. Expand
PROBOSCIS MONKEYS (NASALIS LARVATUS (WURMB, 1787)) HAVE UNUSUALLY HIGH-PITCHED VOCALIZATIONS
TLDR
The high pitch vocalizations of captive proboscis monkeys in the Singapore Zoological Gardens are analysed and it is discussed that the high frequency may be an adaptation for predator avoidance (crocodiles) and/or communication in dense vegetation. Expand
Comparative phylogeography of three primate species in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary, Sabah, Malaysia
TLDR
The effects of forest fragmentation and geographical barriers, especially the Kinabatangan River, on three species of primates with different social systems and dispersal abilities and the social structure of primate species profoundly influences patterns of mitochondrial genetic diversity are investigated. Expand
Homosexual Behavior in Female Mountain Gorillas: Reflection of Dominance, Affiliation, Reconciliation or Arousal?
TLDR
This work presents data on homosexual behavior in female mountain gorillas in the Virunga Volcanoes (Rwanda) and test four functional hypotheses, namely reconciliation, affiliation, dominance expression and sexual arousal. Expand
Primate viability in a fragmented landscape: genetic diversity and parasite burden of long-tailed macaques and proboscis monkeys in the lower Kinabatangan floodplain, Sabah, Malaysia
TLDR
High levels of diversity and evidence of positive selection were found in the long-tailed macaque sequences, which included representatives of several -DRB loci/lineages according to phylogenetic analyses, while Parasite richness was higher in proboscis monkeys, and prevalence of particular parasites differed between the primates. Expand
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