Mating and Reproduction of Predaceous Diving Beetles, Dytiscus sharpi, Observed Under Artificial Breeding Conditions

@inproceedings{Inoda2003MatingAR,
  title={Mating and Reproduction of Predaceous Diving Beetles, Dytiscus sharpi, Observed Under Artificial Breeding Conditions},
  author={Toshio Inoda},
  booktitle={Zoological science},
  year={2003}
}
  • T. Inoda
  • Published in Zoological science 1 March 2003
  • Biology, Medicine
Abstract Mating season and embryonic development of the predaceous diving beetles, Dytiscus sharpi, (Coleoptera; Dytiscidae) were observed under artificial breeding conditions. Female and male adult insects started mating from November to March and gave first instar larvae mainly in April. When the mating was artificially delayed until February, first instar larvae appeared from the end of March to the middle of May. I also investigated the effects of temperature on larval development. Apparent… 
Temperature-Dependent Regulation of Reproduction in the Diving Beetle Dytiscus sharpi (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)
TLDR
It is concluded that the termination of summer reproductive diapause of D. sharpi is regulated in a temperature-dependent manner, thus effecting the adaptation of Dytiscus sharpi to southern warm habitats.
Gonad development and sperm motility of the diving beetle Cybister brevis Aubé, 1838 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) in response to seasonal changes in Japan
TLDR
Interestingly, high sperm motility was exhibited in May and September, whereas it was low in December and March, which indicates the maturation difference between females and males.
Dietary Program for Rearing the Larvae of a Diving Beetle, Dytiscus sharpi (Wehncke), in the Laboratory (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)
TLDR
It is suggested that it is crucial for Dytiscus larvae to have access to tadpoles of the proper size and amounts, depending on their growth stage, as well as how the size and number of R. ornativentris tadpole were correlated with the developing stage of beetle larvae.
Preference of oviposition plant and hatchability of the diving beetle, Dytiscus sharpi (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) in the laboratory
TLDR
Results suggest that O. javanica is an important aquatic plant for oviposition by D. sharpi, and was the major species present in March, when first instar larvae appeared.
Predaceous Diving Beetle, Dytiscus sharpi sharpi (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) Larvae Avoid Cannibalism by Recognizing Prey
  • T. Inoda
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Zoological science
  • 2012
TLDR
The larvae of D. sharpi sharpi are capable of recognizing prey scent, which enables the promotion of foraging behavior and the prevention of cannibalism, and is suggested to provide direct evidence of self-other recognition at the species level.
Diving beetle offspring oviposited in amphibian spawn prey on the tadpoles upon hatching
TLDR
This report reports the first case of adult diving beetles ovipositing their eggs within spawn of the sandpaper frog, Lechriodus fletcheri, and suggests this oviposition behaviour may be common among diving beetles and could form a significant predatory threat for amphibians with a free-swimming larval stage in ephemeral freshwater habitats.
Diving beetle offspring oviposited in amphibian spawn prey on the tadpoles upon hatching
TLDR
The first case of adult diving beetles ovipositing their eggs within spawn of an amphibian species (sandpaper frog, Lechriodus fletcheri) is reported, and this oviposition behavior might be common among diving beetles and could form a significant predatory threat for amphibians with a free‐swimming larval stage in ephemeral freshwater habitats.
The Inheritance of Intrasexual Dimorphism in Female Diving Beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)
TLDR
It is suggested that the female dimorphism is determined by genetics, and that the grooved morph was dominant over the smooth one, independent of environmental factors.
New Open Aquarium System to Breed Larvae of Water Beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)
TLDR
A new open aquarium system without water circulation was developed that was successfully applied to the rearing of larvae of diving beetles, Dytiscus sharpi (Wehncke) (Coleoptera: Dyticalidae), and a high proportion of larvae developed into adult insects.
Mass breeding larvae of the critically endangered diving beetles Dytiscus sharpi sharpi and Dytiscus sharpi validus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)
TLDR
This mass breeding method can be used for the conservation and breeding of these rare diving beetles in a manageable number of aquaria and well-fed mass-bred adults were larger than individually bred and field-collected adults.
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