Maternal vitamin A deficiency and mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1

@article{Semba1994MaternalVA,
  title={Maternal vitamin A deficiency and mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1},
  author={Richard D. Semba and John D. Chiphangwi and Paolo G. Miotti and Gina Dallabetta and Donald R Hoover and Joseph K. Canner and A J Saah},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={1994},
  volume={343},
  pages={1593-1597}
}
Maternal serum vitamin A levels are not associated with mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in the United States.
  • H. Burger, A. Kovacs, W. Blaner
  • Medicine
    Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes and human retrovirology : official publication of the International Retrovirology Association
  • 1997
TLDR
Analysis of the data obtained from 95 women in the United States indicates that vitamin A deficiency is rare, and serum retinol levels are not associated with risk of vertical HIV-1 transmission, and pregnant HIV- 1-infected women living in nations where vitamin A deficiencies are not a public health problem should not be advised to take extra vitamin A supplements.
Mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection: nutrition/HIV interactions.
TLDR
Although it seems unlikely, a potentially harmful effect of vitamin A supplementation on maternal infection, and therefore on vertical transmission, could be through increasing HIV repli~ation.
Vitamin A deficiency and maternal-infant transmission of HIV in two metropolitan areas in the United States
TLDR
Increased risk of maternal-infant transmission was associated with severe vitamin A deficiency among non-breastfeeding women in these cohorts from the United States.
Vitamin A deficiency and maternal‐infant transmission of HIV in two metropolitan areas in the United States
TLDR
Increased risk of maternal-infant transmission was associated with severe vitamin A deficiency among non-breastfeeding women in these cohorts from the United States.
Infant mortality and maternal vitamin A deficiency during human immunodeficiency virus infection.
  • R. Semba, P. Miotti, D. Hoover
  • Medicine, Biology
    Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
  • 1995
TLDR
Maternal vitamin A deficiency during HIV infection may contribute to increased infant mortality in HIV-infected mothers and their infants in Malawi.
Maternal vitamin A deficiency and child growth failure during human immunodeficiency virus infection.
  • R. Semba, P. Miotti, D. Hoover
  • Medicine
    Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes and human retrovirology : official publication of the International Retrovirology Association
  • 1997
TLDR
This study suggests children born to HIV-infected women who are vitamin A-deficient during pregnancy are more likely to have growth failure.
HIV: prevention of mother-to-child transmission.
TLDR
This systematic review presents information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiretroviral drugs, different methods of infant feeding, elective caesarean section, immunotherapy, micronutrient supplements, vaginal microbicides, and vitamin supplements.
Maternal vitamin A status and mother-to-child transmission of HIV in West Africa. DITRAME Study Group.
TLDR
The DITRAME ANRS 049a trial, which was placebo-controlled and evaluated the efficacy of a short regimen of zidovudine in reducing MTCT in breastfed children in Abidjan and Bobo-Dioulasso, considered cases of paediatric infection up to 90 days after birth.
Infant feeding and risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in São Paulo State, Brazil
TLDR
Breast-feeding was independently and significantly associated with mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 and a trend was shown toward an increased risk of transmission with longer duration of breast-feeding, a history of bleeding nipples, and introduction of other liquid food before weaning, but these associations were not statistically significant.
Nutritional indicators of adverse pregnancy outcomes and mother-to-child transmission of HIV among HIV-infected women.
TLDR
Anemia, poor weight gain during pregnancy, and low BMI in HIV-infected pregnant women are associated with increased risks of adverse infant outcomes and MTCT of HIV.
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