Maternal time budgets of gelada baboons

@article{Dunbar1988MaternalTB,
  title={Maternal time budgets of gelada baboons},
  author={Robin I. M. Dunbar and Patsy Dunbar},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1988},
  volume={36},
  pages={970-980}
}
Abstract Data from gelada baboons, Theropithecus gelada, were used to evaluate Altmann's (1980) model of maternal time budgets. The results provide substantial confirmation of the model's general principles: the time that a female devoted to feeding increased with the age of her infant roughly in line with the model's predictions. However, the rate of increase in feeding time was influenced both by environmental ractors affecting the nutritional quality of the herbage and by the infant's own… 
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Feeding behavior of lactating brown lemur females (Eulemur fulvus) in Mayotte: influence of infant age and plant phenology
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  • Biology, Medicine
    American journal of primatology
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It appears that female brown lemurs do not devote more time to feeding during the infant growth period, and the frequency of feeding reflects the cost of lactation better than suckling duration, while food quality affects the amount of time that females devote to feeding activity, and is predictable from rainfall and temperature data.
Changes in the Activity Budget of Wild Female Chimpanzees in Relation to Their Reproductive States
Activity budgets of wild female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in three reproductive states (estrous, anestrous, lactating) were compared with each other. Three lactating females, five
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