Maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood lymphoma: A meta‐analysis

@article{Antonopoulos2011MaternalSD,
  title={Maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood lymphoma: A meta‐analysis},
  author={Constantine N. Antonopoulos and Theodoros N. Sergentanis and Charalampia Papadopoulou and Elisabeth K Andrie and Nick Dessypris and P. Panagopoulou and Sofia Polychronopoulou and Apostolos Pourtsidis and Fani Athanasiadou-Piperopoulou and Maria Kalmanti and Vassiliki Sidi and Maria M Moschovi and Eleni Th Petridou},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2011},
  volume={129}
}
Results from epidemiological studies exploring the association between childhood lymphoma and maternal smoking during pregnancy have been contradictory. This meta‐analysis included all published cohort (n = 2) and case–control (n = 10) articles; among the latter, the data of the Greek Nationwide Registry for Childhood Hematological Malignancies study were updated to include all recently available cases (‐2008). Odds ratios (ORs), relative risks and hazard ratios were appropriately pooled in… Expand
Is birth weight associated with childhood lymphoma? A meta‐analysis
TLDR
Although current evidence suggests no association, birth weight might be a too crude indicator to reveal a genuine association of fetal growth with specific lymphoma categories; hence, there is an emerging need for use of more elaborate proxies, at least those accounting for gestational week. Expand
A Meta-Analysis of Parental Smoking and the Risk of Childhood Brain Tumors
TLDR
It is indicated that parental smoking may not be associated with a risk of CBT, and dose–response meta-analysis showed no significant association between parental smoking and the risk ofCBT. Expand
Maternal and birth anthropometric characteristics in relation to the risk of childhood lymphomas: a Swedish nationwide cohort study
TLDR
Findings point to accelerated intrauterine growth as a risk factor for childhood NHL that may differ by sex, however, further studies with more elaborate indices are needed to conclude on its association with rare diseases such as HL. Expand
Risk for childhood leukemia associated with maternal and paternal age
TLDR
Maternal and paternal age represents a meaningful risk factor for childhood leukemia, albeit of different effect size by leukemia subtype, and genetic and socio-economic factors may underlie the observed associations. Expand
Breastfeeding and the risk of childhood cancer: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis
TLDR
A protective role of breastfeeding on the risk of childhood leukemia is supported, also suggesting a non-linear dose-response relationship, and further studies are warranted to confirm the association between breastfeeding and risk of Childhood neuroblastoma. Expand
Cigarette smoking and risk of lymphoma in adults: a comprehensive meta-analysis on Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin disease
TLDR
Cigarette smoking seems to be associated with increased lymphoma risk, especially HL and T-NHL, and further well-designed studies seem to be needed so as to investigate the risk thoroughly, especially for T-nHL subentities, and the extent to which confounding may interfere with gender-related disparities. Expand
Parental alcohol consumption and risk of leukemia in the offspring: a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
The largest ever meta-analysis shows a sizeable, statistically significant dose–response association of maternal alcohol consumption during index pregnancy with AML risk, and the role of genetic polymorphisms is anticipated to shed light on the underlying pathophysiology. Expand
Maternal Smoking and the Risk of Cancer in Early Life – A Meta-Analysis
TLDR
According to meta-analyses, maternal smoking is associated with nervous system cancers, but not with leukemia in early life, and five other cancer types were examined. Expand
Maternal exposure to pesticides and risk of childhood lymphoma in France: A pooled analysis of the ESCALE and ESTELLE studies (SFCE).
TLDR
The results suggest that maternal domestic use of insecticides during pregnancy might be related to both childhood Hodgkin (HL) and HL. Expand
Birth characteristics and risk of lymphoma in young children.
TLDR
Data support previously reported associations between Hispanic ethnicity and HL and suggest that pregnancy related factors, such as intra-uterine infections and factors associated with preterm labor, may be involved in lymphoma pathogenesis. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 62 REFERENCES
Childhood hematopoietic malignancies and parental use of tobacco and alcohol: the ESCALE study (SFCE)
TLDR
The hypothesis that only paternal smoking, and not maternal alcohol consumption or cigarette smoking, plays a role in childhood hematopoietic malignancies is supported. Expand
Maternal smoking and childhood leukemia and lymphoma risk among 1,440,542 Swedish children.
  • L. Mucci, F. Granath, S. Cnattingius
  • Medicine
  • Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
  • 2004
TLDR
Evidence from this large cohort suggests that maternal smoking affects the risk of childhood leukemia and lymphoma in the offspring, and no way supports maternal smoking as beneficial, given its adverse association with common pregnancy outcomes. Expand
Association of childhood cancer with factors related to pregnancy and birth.
TLDR
Overall, only weak associations were identified and the evaluated risk factors operating during the neonatal and prenatal period account at most for only a small proportion of childhood cancers. Expand
Maternal and perinatal factors associated with non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma among children
TLDR
Most of the maternal andPerinatal characteristics studied did not markedly affect risk for childhood NHL, which may be due to maternal and perinatal factors not included in these data or to exposures later in life. Expand
Maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood cancer.
TLDR
It is concluded that maternal smoking during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of childhood cancer in this cohort of liveborn children. Expand
Population-based study of lymphoma in Germany: rationale, study design and first results.
TLDR
The results of this study are partly consistent with the hygiene hypothesis, but the inconsistencies of some of the findings with an explanation by the Th1/Th2 paradigm warrant further research and may indicate that broader explanatory concepts are needed. Expand
Sun exposure, birth weight, and childhood lymphomas: a case control study in Greece
TLDR
This is the first study to provide epidemiological evidence that increased sun exposure of children may also be associated with a decreased risk of developing childhood non Hodgkin, but not Hodgkin lymphoma. Expand
Maternal smoking in pregnancy: does it increase the risk of childhood cancer?
TLDR
The incidence of cancer was followed through 1987 in a cohort of 497,051 children born 1982-1987 for whom information was available on maternal smoking at 2-3 months of pregnancy. Expand
Maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood cancer in New South Wales: a record linkage investigation
TLDR
Maternal smoking during pregnancy is significantly associated with retinoblastoma and adverse birth outcomes, and should be highlighted to expectant mothers through antitobacco-smoking campaigns. Expand
Prenatal exposure to parents' smoking and childhood cancer.
TLDR
Ass associations with father's smoking in the absence of mother's smoking were found for all cancers combined, suggestive of a possible influence of parents' smoking on childhood cancer. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...