Maternal health in poor countries: the broader context and a call for action

@article{Filippi2006MaternalHI,
  title={Maternal health in poor countries: the broader context and a call for action},
  author={Veronique Filippi and Carine Ronsmans and Oona M R Campbell and Wendy Jane Graham and A. Mills and Josephine Borghi and Marge Koblinsky and David Osrin},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2006},
  volume={368},
  pages={1535-1541}
}
In this paper, we take a broad perspective on maternal health and place it in its wider context. We draw attention to the economic and social vulnerability of pregnant women, and stress the importance of concomitant broader strategies, including poverty reduction and women's empowerment. We also consider outcomes beyond mortality, in particular, near-misses and long-term sequelae, and the implications of the close association between the mother, the fetus, and the child. We make links to a… Expand
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