Maternal hair dye use and risk of neuroblastoma in offspring*

@article{McCall2005MaternalHD,
  title={Maternal hair dye use and risk of neuroblastoma in offspring*},
  author={Erin E. McCall and Andrew F. Olshan and Julie L Daniels},
  journal={Cancer Causes \& Control},
  year={2005},
  volume={16},
  pages={743-748}
}
Objective: Studies have suggested an association between maternal hair dye use and elevated risk of childhood cancer, including neuroblastoma. [...] Key MethodMethods: Cases were children with neuroblastoma diagnosed between 1992 and 1994 at hospitals in the United States and Canada participating in the Children’s Cancer Group or the Pediatric Oncology Group. Random-digit dialing was used to identify one matched control for each case.Expand
Personal use of permanent hair dyes and cancer risk and mortality in US women: prospective cohort study
TLDR
No positive association was found between personal use of permanent hair dye and risk of most cancers and cancer related mortality and the mixed findings in analyses stratified by natural hair color warrant further investigation. Expand
Hair dye use and risk of human cancer.
TLDR
Limited evidences are provided on the association between personal hair dye use and human cancer risk, except for the possibility of hematopoietic cancers and to a lesser extent, bladder cancer. Expand
Risk of neuroblastoma, maternal characteristics and perinatal exposures: the SETIL study.
TLDR
The study suggests maternal exposure to hair dyes and aromatic hydrocarbons plays a role and deserves further investigation in relation to NB occurrence. Expand
The Association of Hair Coloring During Pregnancy with Pregnancy and Neonate Outcomes: A Cross-Sectional Study
Pregnancy is a determining period for both mother and fetus. No mother would jeopardize her baby’s health at any cost. Nowadays, most women dye their hair at some points in their lives, sometimes asExpand
Perinatal characteristics and risk of neuroblastoma
TLDR
Evidence is provided that a few perinatal exposures as recorded in birth records may play a role in NB etiology, and age group specific analyses indicated that maternal hypertension and maternal age <20 years increased risks for infant NB only. Expand
Maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood cancer in New South Wales: a record linkage investigation
TLDR
Maternal smoking during pregnancy is significantly associated with retinoblastoma and adverse birth outcomes, and should be highlighted to expectant mothers through antitobacco-smoking campaigns. Expand
The epidemiology of neuroblastoma: a review.
TLDR
The goal of this review was to summarise the existing epidemiological research on risk factors for neuroblastoma and review the methodological limitations of prior research and make suggestions for further areas of study. Expand
Is it safe to use hair dyes during pregnancy? An uptade
TLDR
Case-controlled retrospective studies based on interview method were conducted to investigate the fetal impacts of exposure to hair dye, and it was observed that a no change occurred in any significant soft tissue or skeletal system in human pregnancy. Expand
Perinatal risk factors for neuroblastoma
TLDR
Generally, more risk factors were identified as associated with neuroblastoma among younger infants relative to older ages, including high birth weight, heavier maternal gestational weight gain, maternal hypertension, older maternal age, ultrasound, and respiratory distress. Expand
FREQUENCY AND ATTITUDES OF USING HAIR DYES AMONG PALESTINIAN WOMEN
Objective: The objectives of the study were to identify the rate of using hair dyes among Palestinian women, preferences, motivations and attitudes towards their use. Methods: A cross-sectional studyExpand
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