Maternal early pregnancy vitamin D status in relation to fetal and neonatal growth: results of the multi-ethnic Amsterdam Born Children and their Development cohort

@article{Leffelaar2010MaternalEP,
  title={Maternal early pregnancy vitamin D status in relation to fetal and neonatal growth: results of the multi-ethnic Amsterdam Born Children and their Development cohort},
  author={Evelien R Leffelaar and Tanja G. M. Vrijkotte and Manon van Eijsden},
  journal={British Journal of Nutrition},
  year={2010},
  volume={104},
  pages={108 - 117}
}
Low vitamin D levels during pregnancy may account for reduced fetal growth and for altered neonatal development. [] Key Method Data were derived from a large multi-ethnic cohort in The Netherlands (Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD) cohort), and included 3730 women with live-born singleton term deliveries.
The association of maternal vitamin D status with infant birth outcomes, postnatal growth and adiposity in the first 2 years of life in a multi-ethnic Asian population: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) cohort study
TLDR
Maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy did not influence infant birth outcomes, postnatal growth and adiposity outcomes in this cohort, perhaps due to the low prevalence of severe maternal vitamin D deficiency in this population.
Trajectory of vitamin D status during pregnancy in relation to neonatal birth size and fetal survival: a prospective cohort study
TLDR
Vitamin D status trajectory from early to late pregnancy was inversely associated with SGA, LBW and preterm delivery with the lowest odds among women with the highest increment in 25OHD, Thus, both higher vitamin D status in late pregnancy and gestational vitamin D Status trajectory can be suspected to play a role in healthy pregnancy.
Maternal early-pregnancy vitamin D status in relation to linear growth at the age of 5–6 years: results of the ABCD cohort
TLDR
Maternal vitamin D level was not associated with early linear growth in children, and other factors, such as parental height, appear to be more important.
Maternal vitamin D concentrations during pregnancy, fetal growth patterns, and risks of adverse birth outcomes.
TLDR
Low maternal 25(OH)D concentrations are associated with proportional fetal growth restriction and with an increased risk of preterm birth and small size for gestational age at birth and the potential for public health interventions.
Vitamin D levels during pregnancy and associations with birth weight and body composition of the newborn: a longitudinal multiethnic population-based study.
TLDR
In a multiethnic cohort of pregnant women with high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, it is found that there is no independent relation between maternal vitamin D levels and any of the neonatal anthropometric measures, and the strong association between ethnicity and neonatal outcomes was not affected by maternalitamin D status.
Maternal Vitamin D Status and Small-for-Gestational-Age Offspring in Women at High Risk for Preeclampsia
TLDR
Maternal vitamin D status in the second trimester is associated with risk of SGA among all women and in the subgroups of white and nonobese women.
Early pregnancy vitamin D status and risk for adverse maternal and infant outcomes in a bi-ethnic cohort: the Behaviors Affecting Baby and You (B.A.B.Y.) Study.
TLDR
Support is provided for an adverse impact of vitamin D deficiency on birth weight in Hispanic women by the results of the Behaviors Affecting Baby and You Study.
First Trimester Maternal Vitamin D Status and Risks of Preterm Birth and Small-For-Gestational Age
TLDR
The results do not provide support for an association between maternal first trimester 25-OHD deficiency and risk of preterm or SGA birth overall; the association with preterm birth risk among women with darker skin requires further investigation.
Current Recommended Vitamin D Prenatal Supplementation and Fetal Growth: Results From the China–Anhui Birth Cohort Study
TLDR
The findings from China suggest that maternal vitamin D supplementation recommended by the IOM results in a slight but significantly higher fetal level of 25(OH)D and improves fetal growth.
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